Chantal Josee Boisvert, MD

Associate Professor of Ophthalmology

Dr. Chantal Boisvert, Associate Professor of Ophthalmology at Duke University Eye Center, received her medical degree from Laval University School of Medicine and completed her residency in ophthalmology at the University of Montreal Hospitals.  She then completed two fellowships, one in pediatric ophthalmology and strabismus at UCSD Shiley Eye Center, and the other in neuro-ophthalmology at USC Doheny Eye Center.  

Prior to joining Duke, she was Associate Clinical Professor and Director of Medical Education in Ophthalmology at UCI Gavin Herbert Eye Institute, where she assumed the majority of the medical student teaching load in ophthalmology. She also actively participated in the training of ophthalmology and neurology residents, and collaborated with the Marshall B. Ketchum University Southern California College of Optometry to train their optometry students and residents. In September 2019, she was recruited to Duke Eye Center, where she now serves as Chief of the Neuro-Ophthalmology Division.

Her clinical interests include all aspects of neuro-ophthalmology, including double vision and strabismus (misalignment of the eyes). She specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of a variety of optic nerve, cranial nerve, and brain disorders affecting the vision. She performs strabismus repairs in adults, extraocular muscle and temporal artery biopsies, optic nerve sheath fenestrations, periocular/occipital nerve blocks, periocular steroid injections for the treatment of auto-immune conditions affecting the optic nerve and botulinum toxin injections for blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm. She is also co-leading a multidisciplinary clinic specializing in eye strokes with a Duke stroke neurologist, Dr. Brian Mac Grory, MB, BCh, BAO. 

Dr. Boisvert has collaborated with neuroscientists and clinicians on different research projects. She recently supervised a group of medical students who went to Tanzania to characterize the pediatric vision needs, assess for the parents’ ability to recognize signs of vision problems in children, and survey on their opinions regarding pediatric eye care accessibility and importance. She has extensive experience in the evaluation and treatment of refractive error and visual field assessment in non-human primates (NHPs), some of her work has been presented to national veterinary medicine conferences. She has also collaborated on many different clinical trials involving the nervous system.

Education and Training

  • Universite Laval (Canada), M.D. 2003

Publications

Review of Vitreopapillary Traction Syndrome

Vitreopapillary traction (VPT) syndrome is a potentially visually significant disorder of the vitreopapillary interface characterised by an incomplete posterior vitreous detachment with the persistently adherent vitreous exerting tractional pull o

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